The Impressa’s control panel is based around a central colour display that’s used to guide you though the process, which helps to turn a maze of functions into an intuitive set of menus (or a carousel as Jura call it). The control of the menus is achieved by a ‘rotary switch’ located on top of the machine at the front, neatly sandwiched between the power and program buttons. The buttons either side of the screen vary in purpose, depending what’s on the screen at the time. in general though, the screen splits into four zones, with each button used to select the corresponding zone.

What sets the Jura line of coffee machines apart for other similar coffee systems is that it does literally everything you need to do with the touch of a button. When preparing the machine, you simply load it with coffee and water, and if it’s your preference, milk or cream. We were originally concerned about cleaning dairy products out of the Jura as this can be a pain point with other systems. You don’t want dairy leftover in any part of the machine as it turns quickly and can easily ruin upcoming batches of coffee. But with the Jura, you load the milk into an easy to remove and clean stainless steel canister making the clean up super simple.


As with other Jura machines, the Impressa Z6 is hygienic and conveniently cleans up after itself. The extra large 2.4 L water tank has a handle for easy removing, and is designed to work with a Smart Water Filter, which uses RFID technology to communicate with the control panel about its lifespan, automatically alerting you when it needs changing. Using a filter ensures great tasting coffee and reduces the need for descaling. The Impressa Z6 automatically rinses on start up, and keeps a reminder to clean the milk circuit on-screen when needed. All of the maintenance processes, such as brew group cleaning and descaling, will throw alerts as well, and are easily accessed through the TFT display where they can be performed by pressing a button. Step up to the Giga 5 for a dual grinder, dual boiler machine for high speed brewing and added functionality; or for a smaller machine you can control with your smartphone, take a look at the intuitive, ultra-convenient J6.
The Impressa’s control panel is based around a central colour display that’s used to guide you though the process, which helps to turn a maze of functions into an intuitive set of menus (or a carousel as Jura call it). The control of the menus is achieved by a ‘rotary switch’ located on top of the machine at the front, neatly sandwiched between the power and program buttons. The buttons either side of the screen vary in purpose, depending what’s on the screen at the time. in general though, the screen splits into four zones, with each button used to select the corresponding zone.

You can also make milky or foamed coffees, thanks to a tube that can be placed in a milk jug (or Panasonic’s own optional “Milktank” accessory). Or just have the machine squirt out hot water for tea-making. You can also tweak the amount of coffee, water and milk, and the temperature before a drink is made, and save up to four of these combinations on the machine as personal favourites.
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Best of all, thanks to a thermal coffee pot, if you don't polish off the whole pot right away, it will still stay piping hot hours after it was brewed. For $130, the MT600 from Capresso offers all these abilities plus is wrapped up into a snazzy brushed-metal-and-black-plastic frame. Sure, the MT600 won't deliver a truly sublime cup of drip-brewed coffee. For that there's no getting around splurging at least $200 and up for a more capable machine.
1) After much research, I purchased the F9 at Williams Sonoma, primarily because they used to have a policy that you could return anything, at any time, if needed. So, I figured that if ever I had an issue, I could just return it to my local Williams Sonoma and get a replacement rather than returning the machine to the factory and waiting. Turns out I did indeed have to do this once for an electrical issue, which was actually an issue I had with the wiring at the outlet--not the machine afterall! In any event, I don't think Williams Sonoma still has that same open-ended return policy. Be sure to research the return policy wherever you make your purchase!

Also, we went through a brief episode in which it would refuse to brew anything (as if it didn't have the power to punch the water through the puck of coffee). I remedied this with a descaling cycle as well as wiping out the parts above the removable tray thoroughly. (I use filtered water in the machine, but the descaling seems to be a more serious cleaning than the normal automatic cleaning.)


As we continue on our journey of Jura Coffee Makers, the Impressa C65 is another “standard” unit. It doesn’t have all of the accouterments of higher-end models, but it still makes an incredible cup of coffee, and it offers the speed and convenience that you would expect from Jura. Overall, we would compare this model to the ENA 9 above, although this one can make two cups at once.
The Unpleasant: There is hardly anything negative about this sublime machine. Due to its small water reservoir, the Impressa Z7 was not designed for offices or households with multiple coffee drinkers. Furthermore, it may be inconvenient for individuals who drink several cups of coffee throughout the day since that would require frequent refilling of the reservoir. If you’re interested in one with a larger water tank, check out Jura-Capresso S8.
It’s a lovely looking, all-metal thing, with even accessories like the tamper and milk jug exuding an air of quiet, understated luxury. The portafilter is reassuringly weighty and solid, locking into the group head with a satisfying twist. There are clever little touches you can’t see or immediately feel that add to the feeling of quality too: on top is a tray that warms your cups, and the 2l water tank has an integrated, changeable filter.
Along with premium engineering, Capresso products are designed with high-end aesthetics in mind. Clean black trims, aesthetic curves, and clean stainless steel finishes are all common branding traits. Capresso products are also notably ergonomic, featuring comfortable handles, easily visible and extruded controls, and a notable lack of rough edges. With design awards to back it up, Capresso produces beautiful, innovative, and powerful coffee equipment.
I’m Geoff. I love coffee, and have tried a bunch of different coffee making techniques and gadgets over the years – everything from fancy La Marzocco’s, to industrial Bunn’s, to Aeropress, and even (gag) instant. While bean selection and the actual making of coffee tends to get a lot of attention, the grinding of the beans is often overlooked (or bypassed). Scroll back up and find the right grinder for you.
Although the low RPM motor is a fantastic feature of this Capresso grinder, it may struggle with darker, oilier beans on the finest grind settings. The mechanical timer is also not as precise as one would wish, as the machine begins grinding the moment you turn the dial. As a result, grind quantities are fairly inconsistent. Another notable disadvantage is the fact that the 565’s bean hopper is not entirely airtight, making it unsuitable for storing coffee beans for more than a few days at a time. Finally, due to the design of its grind chute and a recurring problem with static cling, this grinder can get fairly messy.
The Impressa Z6 employs Jura’s innovative Pulse Extraction Process brewing system. As opposed to a constant flow, water is instead pulsed through the grounds in short intervals that extract greater intensity and aroma while shortening the overall brew time. With P.E.P., espresso and ristretto can be prepared with greater clarity and flavor than ever before.
I have had a Capresso C3000 super automatic for many years that I was starting to have some minor problems with (small water leak, tray sensors corroding) and decided it was time to get a replacement. I work from home and tend to drink coffee most of the day so I'm looking for something that works reliably and for a very extend period of time. I started looking at the new super automatics from the Jura Capresso based on the longevity of the old C3000. I will admit, it's the TFT display that really caught my eye on this one. I started looking thinking that I'd end up with a Z series, but the TFT display was what veered me over to this one.

Turn, press, enjoy – that’s how easy it is to enter the world of IMPRESSA C65 With the one-switch operating concept of the Rotary Switch and the 11-language plain text display, it’s easy to create the perfect coffee every time. Thanks to the high-performance conical grinder, the beans are always freshly ground. The simple, compact design with its elegant combination of matte and gloss black gives the IMPRESSA C65 an imposing yet understated look in any surroundings.
Jura does not make any budget-friendly machines, so you should come in expecting to make an investment. Prices range from $800 for a single cup machine, to above $5,000 for Jura’s top of the line model. You can always search for refurbished models, and Jura occasionally offers factory serviced machines that function like new, but have been returned to the company for unspecified reasons.
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