Any coffee-based beverage is only going to be as enjoyable as the beans that are used to make it. If you don’t already, you will need to source high-quality, whole coffee beans and drink enough coffee to make sure that those beans aren’t going stale. You can use any beans that you like, but small batch and single-origin coffee beans are going to make a world of difference over bulk and mass-produced coffee beans.
Not only is it incredibly stylish, but the S8 grinds beans to your desired fineness, brews the perfect cup of coffee (or two perfect cups if you want), froths and steams milk to the perfect temperature and desired foaminess, and even cleans itself when set on the proper cycle. In short, this dynamo does just about everything but drink the coffee for its owner.
The Unpleasant: There is hardly anything negative about this sublime machine. Due to its small water reservoir, the Impressa Z7 was not designed for offices or households with multiple coffee drinkers. Furthermore, it may be inconvenient for individuals who drink several cups of coffee throughout the day since that would require frequent refilling of the reservoir. If you’re interested in one with a larger water tank, check out Jura-Capresso S8.
Of course, this is not all and you get a wide range of other impressive functions, such as ceramic valve technology, pre-ground option for decaf, 1-touch cappuccino system, large bean hopper with sensor and adjustable height brew spouts. Therefore, if you’re looking for the ultimate in espresso machines, then you certainly need to consider the Jura XS90 and experience how the perfect espresso shot actually tastes like.
The Impressa’s control panel is based around a central colour display that’s used to guide you though the process, which helps to turn a maze of functions into an intuitive set of menus (or a carousel as Jura call it). The control of the menus is achieved by a ‘rotary switch’ located on top of the machine at the front, neatly sandwiched between the power and program buttons. The buttons either side of the screen vary in purpose, depending what’s on the screen at the time. in general though, the screen splits into four zones, with each button used to select the corresponding zone.
Anyone who is looking for the perfect espresso machine, should certainly take a closer look at the Cuisinart EM-600. This model is able to brew excellent traditional coffee beverages and espresso shots at the touch of a button and without you having to worry about moving the cup. The EM-600 incorporates a removable milk tank (22 oz) which sends frothy, creamy and hot milk right into your cup for barista quality, hands free latte and cappuccino. If you want to use it with the Illy Espresso capsule system, you’ll be very happy to know that this model offers innovative froth controls, flavor strength and temperature control with the push of a button.
You’ll find the same basic components in a super automatic espresso machine that you’re going to find in a pump or manual machine: switches, control dials, a steam wand, a boiler and also a water pump. What sets the super automatic apart is the fact that an internal brewing chamber replaces the brew basket and removable portafilter. On top of that, a high quality burr grinder or conical grinder grinds and dispenses the coffee directly into the brewing chamber.
Jura has several coffee machines on the market at several different price points so if you were planning on investing in one (and they are an investment), we’d like to help you make sense of the different features and make clear what you gain and lose as you look at different models while deciding which one is the best fit for your kitchen. In this thorough Jura review guide, we are going to cover what makes the Jura so special and ultimately worth the money, what the best features of each unit are, what to look out for when deciding on a model, and most importantly which Jura coffee machine to buy.
09/16/2010 - The C1000 finally gave out after 10+ years and service fees of $250. With all lights now flashing and the loudest grinding noise ever, it was confirmed today with Jura-Capresso Customer Service that this unit is not worth their new $250 service fee to repair (if it could be repaired). I still found the C1000 a great appliance and Jura-Capresso a very reputable company. From a cost-analysis perspective (and these are ONLY estimates), I consume about 700 cups per year which requires about 20 pounds of beans at $10 per pound (Fresh Market) or $200 per year. Ten years worth of coffee beans cost about $2,000. Add the $900 cost of the C1000, plus two $125 service fees, my total investment was around $3,150. I excluded the cost of water since we pay a minimal fee, but never use the charged amount. Equivalent cups of pressure brewed coffee (about $3 per cup from Starbucks) over this ten year period would cost about $21,000. I compare Starbucks prices since there is a huge quality difference between their pressure-brewed coffee and drip coffee at your local food mart. So my break-even point with the Jura-Capresso C1000 was between one and two years. The remaining eight to nine years of coffee I consumed was at no cost (when compared to Starbucks). This analysis only includes the direct financial cost and not the cost of your time/fuel getting to Starbucks. I happily accepted Jura-Capresso’s "one-time replacement offer" to upgrade my C1000 to a new IMPRESSA C5. The list price is $999, but the upgrade cost is only $600. Although my C1000 unit has experienced problems, it continues to be the most awesome coffee machine ever! Once my IMPRESSA C5 machine arrives and has been used a short time, I will post a new product review.Read full review...
The Unpleasant: There is hardly anything negative about this sublime machine. Due to its small water reservoir, the Impressa Z7 was not designed for offices or households with multiple coffee drinkers. Furthermore, it may be inconvenient for individuals who drink several cups of coffee throughout the day since that would require frequent refilling of the reservoir. If you’re interested in one with a larger water tank, check out Jura-Capresso S8.
It’s affordable (£70 at Argos at the time of writing; Dolce Gusto pods are priced at around £4 for a box of 16) and incredibly simple to set up and use. Simply fill the removable water tank with cold H2O, pop your chosen coffee pod into a slide-out drawer at the front, stick a cup under the spout and hit the power button. When it turns from red to green (a mere few seconds) the machine is ready. You then push the water lever either left (for cold drinks) or right (for hot drinks) until the desired amount of your drink is in the cup. Then slide out the drawer, expel the pod and throw it away.

The Delightful: The sleek, elegant and intuitive Jura-Capresso S8 makes it easy for anyone to whip up gourmet long crema coffees, espressos, cappuccinos, and lattes effortlessly at home. Users have ultimate control over the strength and flavor of the brew, and even those impaired by early-morning caffeine deficiencies can make a sublime cup of coffee in minutes.
In creating a stripped down, low-priced grinder that is still able to deliver a high-quality grind Capresso has released a machine that only features what is truly important in a coffee grinder. Absent are all the automatic or intelligent features that are found on more expensive grinders and instead this one has only reliability and basic ease of use left.
The Jura Super Automatic F50 pump driven espresso machine takes care of everything for the coffee lover with the push of a single button: it grinds the beans, brews the coffee and finally ejects the puck. In fact, due to its various functions, design and overall usability, it’s highly recommended for novice level baristas or people who want to conveniently prepare their coffee. Also, compared to a steam machine, the F50 uses a greater pressure and therefore makes your espresso taste a lot better.
One downside of the C65 is that it isn’t self-cleaning. If you don’t mind taking it apart and rinsing everything out manually, then that shouldn’t be an issue. However, as James mentioned, sometimes the bean holder will think that it’s empty when there are still grounds inside. Overall, it is a minor inconvenience, but it can be frustrating when you’re running late in the morning, and you get a smaller cup as a result.
Due to the lower register of the running motor, the Capresso 503.05 is much quieter than most blade grinders; this machine isn’t likely to wake up your family in the morning. Great build quality and fantastic machining make this one of the most durable blade grinders available.Despite the attractive design, fantastic build quality, and convenient features, this is still just a blade grinder.
02/12/2000 - Purchased Capresso C1000 unit at William-Sonoma for $899. Manually cleaning the internal screen after every few cycles is no big deal. The User’s Manual documentation is a bit over-engineered and could be simplified or reformatted for easier reading and troubleshooting. You do not want to use oily coffee beans as they will stick together and clog the burr grinder. The grinder is also bit noisy, yet produces the perfect cup of pressure-brewed coffee or espresso every time. After using this for a week, I’ve never enjoyed coffee from anyone else including formal restaurants. It was initially pricey but definitely worth every cup.

One downside of the C65 is that it isn’t self-cleaning. If you don’t mind taking it apart and rinsing everything out manually, then that shouldn’t be an issue. However, as James mentioned, sometimes the bean holder will think that it’s empty when there are still grounds inside. Overall, it is a minor inconvenience, but it can be frustrating when you’re running late in the morning, and you get a smaller cup as a result.
...I just bought this machine for my girlfriend's new kitchen. The water sensor in the water tank does not stay in place. Therefore, the machine cannot make coffee because it cannot determine whether or not there is any water in the tank. There is a tiny plastic cap that should hold the sensor in place. The cap doesn't clip in, and floats away as soon as the tank is filled. Therefore the entire machine doesn't work.
This is where a fully automatic espresso machine comes in handy. Once you have set up the machine and tweaked all the settings, you can’t go wrong anymore. All preparation steps are fully automated, the dosage, the tamping, the grind size, temperature, extraction time, etc… You can expect consistent results, a great espresso shot every time. Maybe that’s why many restaurants decided to go with super automatic machines.
The machine is very nice looking in person, very sleek. The instruction manual is pretty sparse on details. It has enough, but it's a little intimidating for a first time user. I took my time and found out that the programming is very user friendly and easy to use. I have ours on our counter with a cabinet overhead. When I fill water reservoir I do pull the machine a bit forward because the reservoir is deep and you have to lift it straight up. It's easy to do but you need a bit of clearance. The bean hopper is in the back, so I pull the machine forward a bit to fill that, as well. Very easy to do. One thing I wanted in the J9 was the option to use a water filter. I have hard water from our tap, and had been filling our DeLonghi from our filtered refrigerator dispenser, but that was cumbersome. With the Jura filter I can fill the deep reservoir right in the little bar sink I have next to the machine. I tested the water before and after, and the Jura filter definitely works to reduce hardness, which is important in keeping the machine free from mineral scale buildup. I think it will be well worth the expense of replacing the filters. It came with one filter and a couple of descaling tabs, which I have not had to use yet.
Setup is way easier than the manual would have you believe - the pathetic printed booklet is by far the weakest link in this coffee production line. Fitting the water filter and the Smart Connect dongle is not explained well at all. You’ll find answers to most of your questions online - but probably not on JURA’s website. Unofficial YouTube videos proved much more useful.
Mixed Reviews. Searching various sources, Jura ENA 5 Reviews seem to have either “love it” or “hate it” reviews and very few in between. This can indicate that the machine is a good design that works well at first, but may not in the long run, and the company is not always stellar at getting machines fixed. Common themes among negative reviews include broken parts and the machines simply stopped functioning.
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