For those really into their coffee drinks, and I mean obsessively so, a separate grinder is an absolute must. That loud noise you hear in the coffee shop every time you go in? That’s the grinder. Now, after saying that, let me tell you the grinder in the F7 is quiet and fast. So don’t worry about your kitchen ending up sounding like a coffee shop’s barista station.

Jura machines differ greatly in size and weight. The smallest machines can be tucked into a corner inconspicuously, but the largest machines take up large amounts of space, and require some room to operate. We will be keeping track of the dimensions to make sure that you don’t end up with a 40-lb. tank for your streamlined, urban apartment. We know, everything looks smaller on the internet!

It makes maintenance much easier (once you’ve learned all of the elements), and it ensures that your machine will last a long time.Secondly, the quality of the grinder is superb, and we love the way that it dispenses a variety of coffees. In the end, the E6 is perfect for all coffee connoisseurs, and it will enhance your enjoyment of these beverages.
Like other Jura machines, the spouts can be adjusted 2.6-4.4” to accommodate any size cup or beverage. We found the adjustable spout really handy in preventing and splashing or spillover onto the machine which limits clean up and also help create the perfect crema. We found the foam that the C65 produced to be incredibly light with almost a light, feather consistency. While the cost of this unit is slightly higher, our calculations had it paying for itself after only a few months. When we tracked the amount of coffee used and compared it to how much it would have been if purchased from a coffee shop, the Jura paid for itself quicker than you might expect. Not to mention these machines are incredibly well built and will last for years before ever needing to be repaired or serviced. And when that time does come, Jura has always been responsive and communicative which makes sending the unit in painless.
You’ll find the same basic components in a super automatic espresso machine that you’re going to find in a pump or manual machine: switches, control dials, a steam wand, a boiler and also a water pump. What sets the super automatic apart is the fact that an internal brewing chamber replaces the brew basket and removable portafilter. On top of that, a high quality burr grinder or conical grinder grinds and dispenses the coffee directly into the brewing chamber.
This machine is awesome. Works great. Very easy to use, and VERY easy to maintain. That last part is key. Our previous machine, Capressa, was a pain to keep clean. This is far easier. Had it for about 6 months now and I've no complaints. The cleaning tablets (ordered on Amazon) are a bit pricey, but I have to imagine far less the sending the machine in for repair (which we did on our Capressa machine) Other than the coffee, cleanliness and overall use of the machine, the maintenance aspect is pretty easy. Put a tablet in the grinder and push the button. Done.
If you have some experience in the world of specialty coffee drinks, skip this short section in our Jura E8 coffee machine review, as you already know all of this.  If you’re new to the game and coming from the world of drip-brew coffee, keep reading, because there’s a key difference between how espresso is made versus how your beloved drip-brew machine works.
As a home barista, you need to master all the above techniques to get the right espresso. If you make a little mistake you compromise your shot. As a result, you’ll get an average shot. Even if you know what it takes to get your shot right, there is very little room for error. Failed shots are pretty common with beginner baristas. You probably noticed in coffee shops that the shot differs from barista to barista.
Semi-automatic espresso machines are just that—semi-automatic. Some of the steps are automated, but many are not. This allows the user to put their personal stamp on the final product but without doing some of the tedious steps that are involved in making an espresso on the stove top. Here’s a look at some of the features that make a semi-automatic espresso machine such a great pickup for the ultimate espresso lover:
My wife LOVES coffee...I like coffee...she works ..I work...we have three kids...I would try to stay in bed longer than her to keep from having to make the coffee in the morning.. For Christmas I bought an Impressa F7 ..I was only prepared to spend about $1000 on a coffee machine at Williams-Sonoma...but the machine I could get for that really lacked some basic features...there were more expensive machines...but the F7 seemed to have most of what I wanted ...I got up Christmas morning to set up the machine, which was relatively easy...(although after 7 or 8 cups of "tweeking" the machine, my heart was pounding up in my throat and when the kids came down to see what Santa had left them I sent them back upstairs for making too much noise)...The coffee was REALLY good...it took a while to learn how to adjust the machine to get what we each liked, but now we love the machine...although there are occassional issues such as a luke warm cup now and then and the frother is marginal...it has made our life in the morning a very pleasant experience...it really doesn't require much upkeep ....wouldn't give it up now...
For those really into their coffee drinks, and I mean obsessively so, a separate grinder is an absolute must. That loud noise you hear in the coffee shop every time you go in? That’s the grinder. Now, after saying that, let me tell you the grinder in the F7 is quiet and fast. So don’t worry about your kitchen ending up sounding like a coffee shop’s barista station.
A “proper” machine that can deliver both single and double shot espressos, its spout has a dual opening allowing you to make two coffees simultaneously. There’s also a steam wand for foaming milk, and the water tank has a decent 1.2l capacity, meaning you won’t need to refill it after making three cups o’ joe. In addition to ground coffee, it’ll also accept E.S.E. coffee pods (we weren’t able to test these, but as they’re made in almost precisely the same way as regular espressos, we imagine they’ll work just fine).
1) After much research, I purchased the F9 at Williams Sonoma, primarily because they used to have a policy that you could return anything, at any time, if needed. So, I figured that if ever I had an issue, I could just return it to my local Williams Sonoma and get a replacement rather than returning the machine to the factory and waiting. Turns out I did indeed have to do this once for an electrical issue, which was actually an issue I had with the wiring at the outlet--not the machine afterall! In any event, I don't think Williams Sonoma still has that same open-ended return policy. Be sure to research the return policy wherever you make your purchase!
While we can sing the praises of the E6 all day, the fact is that there is a bit of a learning curve with it. The instruction manual can be a little confusing to some people, and setting up your cleaning system can take a while. Also, plan on spending more time with maintenance than you would with other coffee makers. In the end, it ensures that your machine is always ready to go, but it can be a bit of a time investment.
You also get programmable push-button controls for milk, hot water and espresso outputs and given the fact that the 1003380 Accademia dispenses great beverages on demand, it’s great for those who don’t like to wait for long before their drink is ready. In total, there are 7 buttons that you can use in order to prepare one of the following drinks hot water, latte macchiato, latte, cappuccino, cafe lungo, cafe and of course, espresso.
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