It might seem like a trivial point, but not all machines have thought about this. The Jura’s power cable emerges at the bottom of the rear of the machine, making it very easy to plug it in and neatly arrange any excess cable out of sight. There’s also a ‘master’ power switch in the same location – worth noting as we discovered, having thought the machine was dead on arrival after pressing the power button on top and nothing happening!
The Impressa’s control panel is based around a central colour display that’s used to guide you though the process, which helps to turn a maze of functions into an intuitive set of menus (or a carousel as Jura call it). The control of the menus is achieved by a ‘rotary switch’ located on top of the machine at the front, neatly sandwiched between the power and program buttons. The buttons either side of the screen vary in purpose, depending what’s on the screen at the time. in general though, the screen splits into four zones, with each button used to select the corresponding zone.

You also get programmable push-button controls for milk, hot water and espresso outputs and given the fact that the 1003380 Accademia dispenses great beverages on demand, it’s great for those who don’t like to wait for long before their drink is ready. In total, there are 7 buttons that you can use in order to prepare one of the following drinks hot water, latte macchiato, latte, cappuccino, cafe lungo, cafe and of course, espresso.
When ditching the K-cup and grinding the coffee yourself, you open yourself up to better, earthy-friendly options. Many single-serve coffee manufactures source their coffee from large plantations, and as a consumer you have very limited choice about where your coffee comes from and how it’s produced. When you grind your own with the Jura coffee machine, you are able to make more eco-conscious decisions about the coffee you purchase. We prefer to buy organic, single-origin roasts that have been certified by the rainforest alliance. We understand that this isn’t always possible, but when you are grinding your own coffee, there are more options available to you as a conscious consumer.
The Aroma G3 grinder uses conical steel burrs and six degrees of fineness to grind quickly, thanks to the perfected cutting angles that produce 60% less residual grounds. The result is a quieter grinder that preserves more of the flavor and aroma of the freshly ground beans while operating twice as fast. An integrated bypass doser allows for pre-ground coffee brewing.

The ECAM28465 uses an integrated frothing system and the milk container in order to immediately deliver to your cup both the right amount of frothed or steamed milk and freshly brewed espresso. That’s not all though: you also get a dual stainless steel-lined thermoblock heating that provides steaming and brewing power for your various coffee drinks. Lastly, you can say goodbye to espresso and other drinks any metallic taste in your coffee that you probably got with other machines and that’s because the Prima Donna S features a stainless steel lining which prevents that from being the case.
Working upstairs or lying in bed? Press the button and (depending on how palatial your abode is) you’ll instantly hear beans being ground into tasty oblivion before the water is heated and poured through them. Then, when you’re ready (the hot plate gives you a 40-minute window), you can brave the trek to the kitchen and find a jug of the delicious black stuff waiting for you.

So far, we’ve been looking at Jura Coffee Makers that can do either one or two cups at once. However, if you don’t plan on sharing, then you probably want a single-serving model instead. The ENA 9 One Touch is one option that can both save money and counter space in your kitchen. Compared to other Jura units, this one has a lot of the same standard features.
And that’s it. There’s very little in the way of cleaning or maintenance to be done, bar an occasional emptying of the drip tray, an occasional rinsing of the removable pod holder and, of course, the refilling of the water tank. The tank isn’t huge (0.8l), so you’ll need to do the latter fairly frequently. The drip tray, for its part, is adjustable – you can place it at one of three heights to suit the size of drinking vessel and reduce the chance of spillage.
So I'm at my local Goodwill store and I was just getting ready to leave when one of the employees brought a cart out of the back with the Jura Capresso F9 sitting on it... I had drooled over their products online for quite a while now but sadly could not afford to drop 1900.00 (what they cost new) on an espresso machine. When I saw the F9 sitting on the cart I quickly grabbed it but noticed a tag on it that said "AS IS NO RETURN" and the price tag below reading $49.99. I was willing to take a chance & at $49.99 I figured I could always sell it for parts on an online auction and get my money back or even make a tiny profit if it didn't work. I got home and downloaded a manual plugged it in, programmed it, installed the filter (there were 4 new filters with it & that alone is worth the $49.99) added espresso beans & guess what it worked perfectly! I have since used it daily, mornings I have a quadruple espresso and evenings I have a latte with 2 shots... It's easy to clean & maintain and having paid only $49.99 I felt like I won the lottery ..
The first notable downside to this economy grinder is the build quality. Although it is standard for high-end burr grinders to use stainless steel enclosures, the Capresso 559 is built from a cheaper plastic. Beyond its suspect longevity, the cheaper build also causes problems in functionality. For example, beans can jam the grinder chute, causing the machine to stop functioning until it is cleaned. 

With a built-in coffee grinder, the Ena Micro 1 will grind your beans just before brewing, and store your beans in an airtight, aroma-preserving chamber on top of the machine. The variable brewing chamber allows for you to choose the individual preparation and strength of two cups at one time. And the included filter ensures your water is as pure as possible for the best-tasting espresso around.
Before we get into the technical aspects of the two types of espresso machines, here’s what you really need to know. Semi-automatic espresso machines are going to be perfect for the espresso connoisseur. If you’re the type that really wants to get the best-quality and taste out of your espresso machine and don’t mind taking a little more time and effort out of your schedule, the semi-automatic espresso maker is going to be for you. It’s a little bit more work, but the key here is that you ultimately have more control over every subtle nuance that goes into your version of the perfect shot of espresso with a semi-automatic.
Like the best espresso machines found in restaurants and cafes, the Capresso EC100 uses bar pressure to extract the greatest flavor out of coffee grounds. You can use finely ground coffee, or for greater convenience on a busy morning, you can make use of the pre-packaged espresso coffee pods. You can brew two cups of espresso at the same time, and you can get your cups toasty warm to keep your beverage hot longer by placing them on the stainless steel cup-warming tray on top.
To really own your drinks, Jura designed the Impressa Z6 super-automatic espresso machine to include three brew temperature and three hot water temperature settings, ten coffee strength settings and ten milk temperature settings. It’s rare that we see so much flexibility for coffee strength, and rarer still to see a wide range of milk temperatures. In truth, many machines don’t feature milk temperature settings at all, so we were excited to brew with the Z6, and it didn’t disappoint. The Impressa Z6 quickly ramps up from brew to steam temperature in a short six seconds, so it’s great for people like us, who need caffeine (and need it now!). For a more full-bodied espresso and decidedly thicker crema, the Impressa Z6 uses Jura’s proprietary Pulse Extraction Process, to fire short pulses of water through the grounds during brewing, in order to get the most out of the extraction. Jura’s innovative TFT display shows, in living color, your personal list of favorite drinks right on the main screen and ready to brew at the push of a button. A longer list of up to 21 customizable specialty drinks is browsable via the rotary switch, so you won’t step on anybody’s toes at the office programming a drink to your particular specifications.
This review and all its parts are ©2003-2019 CoffeeGeek.com and the review in part or in whole may NOT be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author or this website. For information on reproducing any part of this review (or any images) or if you would like to purchase a printed version of this review for commercial or private use, please contact us at info@coffeegeek.com for further details.
The Jura A9 truly shines in the milk drinks department. It features 2 height adjustable spouts that go anywhere from two point two and up to five point four inches if you plan on using taller However, when it comes to the milk, the machine uses a pick-up tube system. What this means is that now you can just place the tube into the milk container and prepare delicious milk based drinks. For better results though, it’s best that you either get Jura’s cool control milk cooler or their optional thermal milk container. That’s because not only is it better to keep milk chilled for sanitary reasons, but chilled milk also produces better froth.
To enable the filter and coffee machine to communicate, JURA uses modern RFID technology. Any machine fitted with the intelligent water system (I.W.S.®) recognises when a filter is inserted, automatically switches to filter mode and starts the rinsing process. When the filter capacity is nearly used up the machine prompts the user to change the filter. If the filter is not changed, the machine activates descaling mode. After a certain amount of use, the user is prompted to descale the machine. This can only be done when the filter is removed, so there is no more risk of user error resulting from misunderstandings.
×