Swiss-manufacturer Jura specializes in crafting high-end specialty coffee makers capable of competing with professional coffee shops. They are available in a wide range of pricing options, and if you’re in the market for one, there are some features to keep in mind. First, know what it actually brews. Jura machines are typically capable of making regular coffee, espresso, and other favorites, so be aware of what you are purchasing. Does it offer a high level of customization, and one-touch operation for those wishing to keep it simple? Is it easy to maintain and clean? Specialized features like adjustable coffee spouts and large-sized water reservoirs are also available.
It’s affordable (£70 at Argos at the time of writing; Dolce Gusto pods are priced at around £4 for a box of 16) and incredibly simple to set up and use. Simply fill the removable water tank with cold H2O, pop your chosen coffee pod into a slide-out drawer at the front, stick a cup under the spout and hit the power button. When it turns from red to green (a mere few seconds) the machine is ready. You then push the water lever either left (for cold drinks) or right (for hot drinks) until the desired amount of your drink is in the cup. Then slide out the drawer, expel the pod and throw it away.
This machine is awesome. Works great. Very easy to use, and VERY easy to maintain. That last part is key. Our previous machine, Capressa, was a pain to keep clean. This is far easier. Had it for about 6 months now and I've no complaints. The cleaning tablets (ordered on Amazon) are a bit pricey, but I have to imagine far less the sending the machine in for repair (which we did on our Capressa machine) Other than the coffee, cleanliness and overall use of the machine, the maintenance aspect is pretty easy. Put a tablet in the grinder and push the button. Done.
The Gaggia Anima Deluxe’s pre-infusion feature is a huge hit with coffee aficionados, as the pre-soaking enhances coffee’s natural flavors and aromas. Its beautiful design looks at home in the modern or traditional settings, bringing the look and feel of a European cafe to your home. The simple user interface combines manual buttons and digital display for foolproof brewing.
The different types of espresso machines include stove top espresso machine, pump less electric machine, manual lever pump, electronic pump, semi-automatic pump, automatic pump, super automatic pump, etc. Further, the Jura coffee machines have some interesting features. According to many Jura espresso machine reviews, Jura Ena Micro 1 is the best espresso machine by Jura. Let us delve deeper into this machine.
This is probably one of the more important points to note – just how easy it is to get started. Bean to cup coffee machines tend to fall into two categories, they are either easy to use but inflexible, or take time to master and give a lot of opportunity to experiment. This Jura machine gives a lot of scope to both, which is great if you’re short on practice time or not sure if you’ve got the skills needed just yet.
The interface is also very clean and easy to use and given the fact that it also has a function for automatic cleaning, you don’t have to worry about cleaning the machine yourself. However, probably the most notable feature (among others) of the XS90 is the fact that it features a low noise design. What I mean by that is that the burr grinder is perfectly insulated and has the lowest noise grinding of any espresso machine on the market today.

The Wrap-up: While someone with simple tastes may be content with a twenty dollar automatic drip coffee maker or instant powders, real coffee lovers will appreciate the finer points of the Jura-Capresso S8. Not only will this superb machine turn out brews worthy of elegant European cafes, but it does so with a surprisingly little effort from the user, thanks to its simple “one-touch” programming.


As with all other blade grinders, transferring grinds to a machine or another container is a messy process. Its grind uniformity cannot compete with a burr mill of comparative price. While adequate for finer grinds, the Capresso 503.05 still underperforms for French press and cold brew. Furthermore, as with all other blade grinders on the market, this one suffers from a buildup of coffee dust. With a tiny bit more money, you can get a much more versatile machine like the 559 (#4 in this list) or 560 Capresso burr grinder (#2).
The large water tank and grounds container allow you to produce large quantities of coffee at a time, making this system ideal for office settings or large gatherings. Two thermo-block heating systems ensure temperature control, while a precision burr grinder with 6 settings allows you ultimate control over your the coarseness of your coffee grounds.
Like the Sage Express, Panasonic’s NC-ZA1 is a “bean to cup” espresso machine: it takes whole beans, grinds them and pushes hot water through them at pressure to produce a cup of coffee. That’s pretty much where the similarities end, however, because unlike the old-school Express, the NC-ZA1 makes almost the entire process automated – and controllable via touchscreen.
The 1150W DeLonghi ESAM3500.N is capable of preparing a wide range of coffee drinks, including lattes, cappuccinos, coffee, espresso and more. You can easily brew directly into the twelve oz cups, demitasse or espresso thanks to the height adjustable coffee spouts this model comes with. Thanks to the instant reheat function, keeping the ESAM3500.N at the right temperature is a breeze, regardless of the length of time between cups.
The first thing you’ll probably notice when making your coffee is just how quiet the Giga 5 is. This is thanks to the two ceramic disk grinders that occupy each side of the unit and operate just above a whisper. These discs will probably never wear our and the grind on them is extremely precise and always consistent. It offers 18 completely customizable specialty drinks through the intuitive and easy to navigate display which provide enough variety to satisfy everyone’s tastes.
Hate getting up in the morning? That’ll change with the Z6. Just the thought of gazing at this handsome clean, shiny chrome machine was enough to have us leaping out of bed at 6am. Brewing coffee is fairly simple and yields powerful, yet tasty cups. Espresso based drinks are a cinch to produce too—but often taste slightly watered down. The best part is though is the nearly silent grinder, which is quiet enough to run on full power without fear of waking the whole house up. —Neil Gellar
It’s a lovely looking, all-metal thing, with even accessories like the tamper and milk jug exuding an air of quiet, understated luxury. The portafilter is reassuringly weighty and solid, locking into the group head with a satisfying twist. There are clever little touches you can’t see or immediately feel that add to the feeling of quality too: on top is a tray that warms your cups, and the 2l water tank has an integrated, changeable filter.
Alright, for the person whose coffee/espresso interest borders on obsession (or strong passion if you will) the F7 probably won’t satisfy. Mainly because of the built-in grinder. For someone who’s aiming for perfection in their brew, a precision standalone grinder and a standalone coffee maker is going to be what they need to look for to really dial in their perfection.
We’re going to start with a rundown of the features of the Impressa F8, so that you know what you’re getting if you choose to buy. A lot of machines offer the same core functions, so we tend to focus on what stands out, so rest assured, if we rate a machine highly (as we do with this one), it’s going to be a good all rounder unless we specifically say otherwise.

When looking for a fully automatic espresso machine, you have the choice to go for either a dual heating system or a single heating system machine. For instance, if you go for a dual boiler machine, then when you’re going to start the steam model, you’ll need to wait for about ten seconds until steam is available. With a single element system, the wait time increases by a factor of 5 and it takes about fifty seconds to get steam.
The first machine I received never worked correctly. The milk would not steam and the espresso would start to come out and then stop. Upon stopping a message would display on the screen asking to press a button to fill the pump. This would occur 2-3 times before an expresso could actually be made. I experimented with several different grind settings, coffee strength, water temperatures, etc, but with no success. The machine continued to pump a few drops of espresso, asking to refill the pump, and waste the previous grinds. I literally wasted 2-3 cans of Illy espresso without ever getting espresso. In addition, with each espresso cycle, a large amount of water would precede any espresso. For example on a 1oz shot, about 0.1oz would be water that didn't run through the coffee.
Also, we went through a brief episode in which it would refuse to brew anything (as if it didn't have the power to punch the water through the puck of coffee). I remedied this with a descaling cycle as well as wiping out the parts above the removable tray thoroughly. (I use filtered water in the machine, but the descaling seems to be a more serious cleaning than the normal automatic cleaning.)
“I Love the convenience of having an automatic Cappuccino machine; it's easy to use and work around if you're used to electronic machines. I like the fact it cleans itself but what the manual and reviews don’t tell you - ALWAYS HAVE A CUP UNDER IT as it rinses a lot and sometimes it does it automatically. So Far So good hope it lasts for years and years.” - Duha, Amazon Customer
It uses a stainless steel conical burr grinder to get your beans just right, and it has a high-pressure system to extract more flavor in less time. The foam frother is remarkable as it produces fine foam that will make your coffee look and taste so much better. You can clean the system out relatively easily, and it allows you to control the strength of your beverages. Finally, it has an energy saver mode, and it’s slimmer than other two-cup models.

Maintenance and Cleaning: If you use steamed milk, I highly suggest changing the setting to display the "Rinse Milk System" prompt to appear right after using. The default is 10 minutes, and you cannot select this rinse from the Maintenance menu. The quicker you rinse out the milk residue, the less likely you are to get clogs. The manual also suggests to use the Jura Cappuccino Cleaner daily. I tend to rinse often and do a breakdown cleaning of the milk system and frother about every other day.
The Micro 1 in many ways is the Micro 9’s little brother. This simple, ultra compact Jura machine features a sleek black design that is both minimal and modern. With the Micro 1, Jura set out to make their smallest unit without sacrificing the power and quality they are known for. And after out tests with a demo unit, we can safely say that they succeeded.
THE CURE: Once weekly reach up inside with a hot, wet towel, and clean the round disk behind the flap that hangs down. If it jams, unplug and let it cool before turning it on - sometimes you may have to do this several times. It just happened this a.m., and I had to wait 1/2 hour between my 3rd and 4th cup :) The first time it happened, tech support walked me through the cleaning on the phone. The last time was more of a problem, and they shipped me a mailing label for a $245 complete rebuild, but I didn't have to use it.
3) This machine is crazy smart. It knows exactly when to clean itself, or tells you when to start the cleaning cycle. To clean it, all you do is insert a tablet in the coffee powder drawer and it does its thing. It knows when it needs water, when the filter needs to be changed, etc. In fact, since we have a water filter built into our refrigerator, we just use that filtered water in the coffee machine and therefore we don't need to use the expensive water filters. Bottom line, if you just pay attention and clean the machine on a regular basis when it tells you to, this is a no-brainer machine.
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