The other reviews comment on the burr grinder sticking and this may be as a result of using oily beans. This problem is addressed in the manual; they offer recommendations on how to get the oils to evaporate somewhat to prevent issues with the machine. The beans I use are not particularly oily and I have never had a problem with the grinder nor any problems with any of the other functions with this machine. This unit has already paid for itself several times over in savings over what I would pay at any coffee house; very pleased with this purchase!
Instead of an LCD screen, this model uses a standard LED to show you what kind of coffee you’re making. It’s not quite as involved, but it’s helpful and better than a manual version. With the ENA 9, you can make six different kinds of coffee. It uses two nozzles to layer your beverages perfectly with foam or milk. The frother is a separate unit that connects to the base machine.
Capresso is actually an amalgamation of the words “cappuccino” and “espresso.” Jura Capresso is known as an innovator, coming up with a lot of firsts. It is the first company to have a programmable coffeemaker/conical burr grinder combination. It also came up with the first automatic drip coffee maker with a stainless steel thermal carafe. The first burr grinder with electronic sensor was also introduced by the company. Other innovations include the first semi-automatic espresso machine, first burr grinder for home use, and first stand-alone automatic milk frother for consumer use.

Jura is a premium brand that specialises in automatic coffee machines. With the majority of their models costing over £1000 - and some as much as £3700 - their target market is coffee enthusiasts who are willing to pay more for the best coffee. On this page, we'll go through some of the best Jura bean-to-cup coffee machines, along with reviews of why we think they are excellent models.
1) After much research, I purchased the F9 at Williams Sonoma, primarily because they used to have a policy that you could return anything, at any time, if needed. So, I figured that if ever I had an issue, I could just return it to my local Williams Sonoma and get a replacement rather than returning the machine to the factory and waiting. Turns out I did indeed have to do this once for an electrical issue, which was actually an issue I had with the wiring at the outlet--not the machine afterall! In any event, I don't think Williams Sonoma still has that same open-ended return policy. Be sure to research the return policy wherever you make your purchase!
For those who tend to like their java a bit more robust and flavorful, this espresso machine offers a coffee and steam wand that you can use to adjust the potency of your coffee. If you prefer a bit less vigor to your morning espresso, simply move the wand to the steam side to add a bit more water. This will allow you to share your espresso maker with those around you who prefer a stronger or milder taste you do and still keep everyone happy.
Jura were new for our 2017 updates on the site, and we fully expect them to feature highly in our top ten table for 2018, alongside the likes of the Melitta Caffeo Barista TS. With our early reviews, we put the majority of effort into the big names and big sellers, like the Delonghi Magnifica ESAM4200 that’s always near the top of the bestseller list on Amazon. Now that we’ve fairly comprehensively covered those, our attention is shifting towards the premium models that may not sell as many, but will really attract people that know their coffee, and Jura fit that description perfectly.
First, I really wanted to like this machine. The specs, design, functionality, were exactly what I was looking for in a super automatic espresso machine, however the machine failed to perform the basic task of making espresso. I found the display, programming, controls, and size of the water chamber to be good. The milk frothing system was cumbersome as it required you to attach tubes each time you wanted a milk drink. When the system worked, the steamed milk was hot and the consistency was great for cappuccinos and lattes. However, if the tube was not connected precisely (very little room for error) the consistency of the milk was poor. I ended up having to restart the process several times as the tubes were not connected properly or they came loose as the milk was pumped. The tubes also presented an issue with clean up in that they had to be cleaned after each use.
Whether you like it regular, or ristretto, or long, or Americano, the espresso needs to be smooth. There is some slight bitterness, but it should be very faint. The taste should remind of caramel. If you don’t have any idea of the taste, just go to a good coffee shop and order one. Go for a few days, and try to explore different baristas, and different times of the day. This will give you a great idea. If you don’t like it, and you know the coffee shop is a good one, give up, this is not for you. Some people just don’t like espresso. My wife, for instance, will only accept one if there is no other coffee around. At the end of the day, you have to like it, and you should make it your own.

From the outside, the Giga 5 looks attractive. It has a color TFT (thin film transistor) LCD screen display on the top front and center, with a stylish aluminum chassis with black plastic sides. This unit will definitely enhance the look of any kitchen. There’s a dedicated hot water spout at the front of the machine plus a couple of adjustable spouts for making coffee. Located on top of the unit you will find on/off buttons, a program button, and a rotary switch that is key to navigating the Giga’s menu.


As previously mentioned, this grinder is a bit less sturdy than its new revision, the 565. The 560 has the same issues with its mechanical timer, with the grind mechanism starting before you have had a chance to set the time. This results in a somewhat inconsistent grind quantity. The hopper lid is also not completely airtight, so it isn’t recommended that you keep your beans in it for more than a few days. The same issue with static buildup is also present, and may lead to a messy countertop.
Flipping open the tank lid reveals a plastic wand that houses a charcoal water filter pod (one is provided in the box). The filter setup sits within a special receptacle on the tank's interior left side. According to Capresso, the gadget will remove up to 82 percent of "the chlorine and other impurities found in tap water, and will do so for about six weeks, assuming you make one pot (10 cups) daily. It's a nice option to have, especially if you live in an area with substandard water, although remembering to swap in a new filter can be a drag.
One downside of the C65 is that it isn’t self-cleaning. If you don’t mind taking it apart and rinsing everything out manually, then that shouldn’t be an issue. However, as James mentioned, sometimes the bean holder will think that it’s empty when there are still grounds inside. Overall, it is a minor inconvenience, but it can be frustrating when you’re running late in the morning, and you get a smaller cup as a result.

First, I really wanted to like this machine. The specs, design, functionality, were exactly what I was looking for in a super automatic espresso machine, however the machine failed to perform the basic task of making espresso. I found the display, programming, controls, and size of the water chamber to be good. The milk frothing system was cumbersome as it required you to attach tubes each time you wanted a milk drink. When the system worked, the steamed milk was hot and the consistency was great for cappuccinos and lattes. However, if the tube was not connected precisely (very little room for error) the consistency of the milk was poor. I ended up having to restart the process several times as the tubes were not connected properly or they came loose as the milk was pumped. The tubes also presented an issue with clean up in that they had to be cleaned after each use.


For most users looking into bringing home a Jura, the basics of what to look for are a little fuzzy. There isn’t as much general information on Jura espresso machines, but we’ve compiled our favorite key points to keep in mind for your search. Juras can add a professional quality espresso and sophisticated edge to your day, but they also need to be able to fit within the demands of your lifestyle and environment.
Jura machines differ greatly in size and weight. The smallest machines can be tucked into a corner inconspicuously, but the largest machines take up large amounts of space, and require some room to operate. We will be keeping track of the dimensions to make sure that you don’t end up with a 40-lb. tank for your streamlined, urban apartment. We know, everything looks smaller on the internet!
In just 60 seconds, the Impressa C9 will steam or froth milk, tamp, grind, brew and clean itself. And if you’re looking to brew other drinks, you can use the hot water dispenser for tea, or to enjoy a cup of foamy hot chocolate. You have options to choose the cup size and strength of your coffee for a truly personal brew. Of course, the Impressa C9 also uses a water filter to ensure your coffee tastes as fresh and pure as possible.
To enable the filter and coffee machine to communicate, JURA uses modern RFID technology. Any machine fitted with the intelligent water system (I.W.S.®) recognises when a filter is inserted, automatically switches to filter mode and starts the rinsing process. When the filter capacity is nearly used up the machine prompts the user to change the filter. If the filter is not changed, the machine activates descaling mode. After a certain amount of use, the user is prompted to descale the machine. This can only be done when the filter is removed, so there is no more risk of user error resulting from misunderstandings.
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