The Jura-Capresso S8 is a luxurious coffee and espresso machine with a long list of benefits and only a few detractors. The price would be the biggest obstacle for most consumers, and while those with pure coffee tastes may demure at the price tag, coffee connoisseurs who patronize the typical overpriced chain coffee shops could justify the expense. The bottom line is that one cannot fail to make perfect cafe-style drinks with the sexy, state-of-the-art S8 machine.


First, I really wanted to like this machine. The specs, design, functionality, were exactly what I was looking for in a super automatic espresso machine, however the machine failed to perform the basic task of making espresso. I found the display, programming, controls, and size of the water chamber to be good. The milk frothing system was cumbersome as it required you to attach tubes each time you wanted a milk drink. When the system worked, the steamed milk was hot and the consistency was great for cappuccinos and lattes. However, if the tube was not connected precisely (very little room for error) the consistency of the milk was poor. I ended up having to restart the process several times as the tubes were not connected properly or they came loose as the milk was pumped. The tubes also presented an issue with clean up in that they had to be cleaned after each use.

02/12/2000 - Purchased Capresso C1000 unit at William-Sonoma for $899. Manually cleaning the internal screen after every few cycles is no big deal. The User’s Manual documentation is a bit over-engineered and could be simplified or reformatted for easier reading and troubleshooting. You do not want to use oily coffee beans as they will stick together and clog the burr grinder. The grinder is also bit noisy, yet produces the perfect cup of pressure-brewed coffee or espresso every time. After using this for a week, I’ve never enjoyed coffee from anyone else including formal restaurants. It was initially pricey but definitely worth every cup.

Our final Jura Coffee Maker is technically classified as an espresso maker. As such, it’s only designed for espressos, although you can experiment to make different kinds of beverages if you want. As an espresso machine, this unit is really impressive. If you have used other similar models, you will be impressed by the quality and convenience that the Ena Micro 1 offers.
What sets the Jura line of coffee machines apart for other similar coffee systems is that it does literally everything you need to do with the touch of a button. When preparing the machine, you simply load it with coffee and water, and if it’s your preference, milk or cream. We were originally concerned about cleaning dairy products out of the Jura as this can be a pain point with other systems. You don’t want dairy leftover in any part of the machine as it turns quickly and can easily ruin upcoming batches of coffee. But with the Jura, you load the milk into an easy to remove and clean stainless steel canister making the clean up super simple.
There are other factors to consider, such as color and material, but most Jura machines come with customizable aesthetics. We will cover more in-depth things to know in the next couple of sections, but for now, hold on to this list of general thoughts as we begin to browse the different Jura lines and examine what each different type of machine has to offer.
Jura Capresso was born in 1994 as a company that aimed to deliver high-end European style coffeemakers to the American market. Eight years later, it entered into a joint venture agreement with Jura AG, a Swiss developer and distributor of automatic coffee centers that is present in more than 50 countries. By 2008, Jura AG had become the sole owner of all Jura Capresso operations.
Starting with the brew unit, the first thing to understand is that it’s not removable.  From a practical perspective, what that means for you is that about once a week, you’ll need to pop a cleansing tab into the bypass doser to clean the unit.  No big deal, but our personal preference is for removable units you can rinse by hand to ensure a thorough cleaning.

Not only is it incredibly stylish, but the S8 grinds beans to your desired fineness, brews the perfect cup of coffee (or two perfect cups if you want), froths and steams milk to the perfect temperature and desired foaminess, and even cleans itself when set on the proper cycle. In short, this dynamo does just about everything but drink the coffee for its owner.
Best of all, thanks to a thermal coffee pot, if you don't polish off the whole pot right away, it will still stay piping hot hours after it was brewed. For $130, the MT600 from Capresso offers all these abilities plus is wrapped up into a snazzy brushed-metal-and-black-plastic frame. Sure, the MT600 won't deliver a truly sublime cup of drip-brewed coffee. For that there's no getting around splurging at least $200 and up for a more capable machine.
One of the essential selling points of this coffee maker is that it comes with two grinders. This allows you to mix and match between different beans, such as if you want to have regular or decaf as an option. The grinders themselves are also better than anything else that Jura offers. Instead of metal, they are ceramic, which not only means that they last longer, but they are much quieter.
We always like to find a negative or two, and this has to be the biggest one by far for the Jura. For us, the temperature is fine, but we do understand that some people like their coffee as near to boiling point as possible without burning the coffee. It’s probably going to be a minority of coffee lovers that find this to be a deal breaker (hint: if that’s you, take a look at Heston’s Dual Boiler), for most of us, we find that it takes the roof of our mouth off!
Now that great espresso shots aren't hard to find, this machine is more about convenience and reliability than knock-your-socks-off espresso. But it does make great coffee - better than any Mr. Coffee or even Keurig. I keep Dark Roast Guatemalan Viennese in the bean hopper, pull two one-ounce shots, lengthen them with hot water, and I'm drinking awesome coffee before my neighbor has finished peeling the foil on his can of Maxwell House. And since I'm just buying good old whole beans, it's much cheaper to use than a Keurig.
This Jura Impressa F8 review is the first we’ve added to the site from the Swiss manufacturer. The first thing you notice is its classy appearance, in the ‘Piano Black’ colour scheme that’s going to make it look the part in any kitchen. As you read the review, it will become clear why the Impressa F8 has quickly taken the number three spot in our top ten models.
While we can sing the praises of the E6 all day, the fact is that there is a bit of a learning curve with it. The instruction manual can be a little confusing to some people, and setting up your cleaning system can take a while. Also, plan on spending more time with maintenance than you would with other coffee makers. In the end, it ensures that your machine is always ready to go, but it can be a bit of a time investment.
You don’t really need to be a coffee connoisseur to be able to prepare your own drinks with this coffee machine. There are recipes for 12 coffee creations which you can select with the rotary switch. The machine uses images and texts to guide users through the preparation stages. You can prepare coffee choices such as Irish coffee, flavored latte macchiato, Viennese coffee, and Café Melange, amongst others. In addition, this coffee machine is also self cleaning to eliminate any excuses when it comes to making speciality coffee at home.
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